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Security for the Humanitarian Worker

Chapter

Abstract

You are recruited by an NGO operating in a conflict zone to provide medical care for rural villages and to conduct a health needs assessment. Research into humanitarian security in the region paints a bleak picture but you are determined to continue. The NGO plan a low profile approach initially but an increase in the region’s insecurity necessitates the addition of an armed convoy. Despite this one of the supply vehicles hits an improvised exploding device on the road killing several people. The project is cancelled prompting a rethink in the long term security approach and consideration of the financial realities of providing security.

Keywords

Geneva Convention Humanitarian Organization Humanitarian Worker Security Incident Humanitarian Agency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynaecologySt Peter’s HospitalChertsey, SurreyUK

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