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Virtual Reality Technologies and the Creative Arts in the Areas of Disability, Therapy, Health, and Rehabilitation

  • S. V. G. Cobb
  • Anthony L. Brooks
  • Paul M. Sharkey
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

A key theme in the ArtAbilitation conferences is the relationship between sound, movement, and art, and how these can be used for rehabilitation and/or expression by individuals who may have limited access to conventional communication. The development of VR environments and interactive technology has led to a variety of applications that might broadly be considered as telerehabilitation, including the use of 3D space and interactive feedback for remote assistance of users in the areas of navigation and home living. These technologies can provide access to activities and communication for individuals for whom such affordances are otherwise restricted, and can make the process of rehabilitation more engaging and motivating.

Keywords

Virtual Reality Augmented Reality Conference Series Auditory Feedback Interactive Technology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. V. G. Cobb
    • 1
  • Anthony L. Brooks
    • 2
  • Paul M. Sharkey
    • 3
  1. 1.Human Factors Research GroupUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  2. 2.SensoramaLab, AD:MT, School of ICTAalborg University EsbjergEsbjergDenmark
  3. 3.University of ReadingReadingUK

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