Inter-Family Messaging with Domestic Media Spaces

  • Tejinder K. Judge
  • Carman Neustaedter
  • Steve Harrison
Chapter

Abstract

Many family members have a need to stay connected with their loved ones when they are separated by distance. Technologies such as the phone or email help achieve this to some extent, but, many people still feel out of touch with their loved ones. We designed two domestic media spaces—The Family Window and Family Portals—to help distributed family members connect with remote families’ homes using ‘always-on’ video connections. In addition to this, both systems allowed family members to interact using handwritten messaging. Our chapter focuses on this latter functionality to explore the ways in which family members made use of the inter-family messaging features found within our domestic media space systems. Here we discuss both synchronous and asynchronous messaging and the nuances of public vs. private messaging between households. We conclude with a discussion of implications for inter-family messaging systems.

Keywords

Triad 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was graciously funded by Eastman Kodak Company. We are also very thankful for the help and support of researchers and management at Kodak Research Labs: Andrew Kurtz, Andrew Blose, Elena Fedorovskaya, and Rodney Miller. Lastly, we are indebted to the families who participated in our field deployments and spent many hours meeting and interacting with us. Without them, the research would not have been possible.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tejinder K. Judge
    • 1
  • Carman Neustaedter
    • 2
  • Steve Harrison
    • 3
  1. 1.Google Inc.Mountain ViewUSA
  2. 2.School of Interactive Arts and TechnologySimon Fraser UniversitySurreyCanada
  3. 3.Department of Computer Science and School of Visual ArtsCenter for Human-Computer Interaction, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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