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Informatics for the Health Information Technology Workforce

Chapter
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

Interest in informatics education took a significant leap with the inclusion of funding for “workforce development” in the Heath Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, the portion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA, also known as the “economic stimulus bill”) of 2009 devoted to the adoption and meaningful use of health information technology (HIT). The focus of this chapter is on the challenges of trying to create a workforce to meet the informatics and IT needs of a nation that is rapidly changing from a paper medical record environment to electronic health records. The chapter describes the issues that motivated the program, the goals and accomplishments of its components, the lessons learned, and what the future portends after the HITECH funding ends.

Keywords

Community College Curricular Material Health Information Technology Health Information Exchange Electronic Health Record System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical EpidemiologyOregon Health and Science UniversityPortlandUSA

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