Forensic Computing

  • A. J. Sammes
  • B. L. Jenkinson
Part of the Practitioner Series book series (PRACT.SER.)

Abstract

Throughout this book you will find that we have consistently referred to the term “Forensic Computing” for what is often elsewhere called “Computer Forensics”. In the UK, however, this latter name has been adopted by a commercial company operating in the forensic computing field and we felt that it was not appropriate for us to use a name that carried with it commercial connotations. Hence our use of “Forensic Computing”. Having said that, however, we will need on occasion to refer to “Computer Forensics” particularly when quoting from overseas journals and papers which use the term and our use in such circumstances should then be taken as synonymous with that of “Forensic Computing” and not as a reference to the commercial company.

Keywords

Transportation 

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References

  1. ACPO (1999) Good Practice Guide for Computer Based Evidence V2.00, The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) Computer Crime Group.Google Scholar
  2. Pollitt, Mark M. (undated) Computer Forensics: An Approach to Evidence in Cyberspace, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Baltimore, MD.Google Scholar
  3. Pollitt, Mark M. (1995) Principles, practices, and procedures: an approach to standards in computer forensics, Second International Conference on Computer Evidence, Baltimore, MD, 10–15 April 1995. Federal Bureau of Investigation, Baltimore, MD.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Sammes
    • 1
  • B. L. Jenkinson
  1. 1.Department of Informatics and Simulation, Royal Military College of ScienceCranfield UniversityShrivenham, Swindon, WiltshireUK

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