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3D Virtual Community Building Applications in the PANIVE Architecture

  • Chris Flerackers
  • Nic Chilton
  • Rae Earnshaw
  • Wim Lamotte
  • Frank Van Reeth
Chapter

Abstract

PANIVE (PC-based Architecture Networked Interactive Virtual Environments) is an extensible architecture in which various networked virtual environment applications can be realized. This chapter describes our efforts in realizing applications in the area of “3D virtual community building”, in which people can virtually meet each other, speak to each other, interact with each other, etc. in a virtual equivalent of conventional social communities.

The overall architecture will be discussed briefly. Some attention will be given to the realization of the audio component in the system (speech input and 3D sound output) that supports intuitive interaction among the participants in a shared virtual environment.

The main part of the chapter discusses and illustrates some demonstrative example applications that highlight the potential for realizing 3D networked virtual communities in the architecture.

Keywords

Virtual Environment Virtual Community Community Place Compression Format Virtual Setting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris Flerackers
  • Nic Chilton
  • Rae Earnshaw
  • Wim Lamotte
  • Frank Van Reeth

There are no affiliations available

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