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Real-Time Virtual Humans

  • Norman I. Badler
  • Rama Bindiganavale
  • Juliet Bourne
  • Jan Allbeck
  • Jianping Shi
  • Martha Palmer
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  • 124 Downloads

Abstract

The last few years have seen great maturation in the computation speed and control methods needed to portray 3D virtual humans suitable for real interactive applications. Various dimensions of real-time virtual humans are considered, such as appearance and movement, autonomous action, and skills such as gesture, attention, and locomotion. A virtual human architecture includes low-level motor skills, mid-level PaT-Net parallel finite state machine controller, and a high-level conceptual action representation that can be used to drive virtual humans through complex tasks. This structure offers a deep connection between natural language instructions and animation control.

Keywords

Virtual World Computer Animation Virtual Human Applicability Condition IEEE Computer Graphic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman I. Badler
  • Rama Bindiganavale
  • Juliet Bourne
  • Jan Allbeck
  • Jianping Shi
  • Martha Palmer

There are no affiliations available

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