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Photoradiation for Bronchial Carcinoma

  • Philip Hugh-Jones

Abstract

Bronchial carcinoma is at present killing six times as many men and women in Britain as are killed on the roads, and in the 55–65 year age group, in which it is most prevalent, no less than 16 times as many (Office of Population Census and Surveys 1979). Although surgery can be curative for a fortunate few who get the disease (mostly those with peripheral squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma), about 93% of sufferers eventually die from their disease. Much of this toll is preventable simply by ceasing to smoke cigarettes (Royal College of Physicians 1983) but even if that habit were to cease forthwith, which is inconceivable, lung cancer would affect huge numbers of people for the next 20–30 years (Hugh-Jones 1978). Moreover, if young women continue to smoke cigarettes at their present rate, it is predicted in the USA that bronchial cancer will outstrip breast cancer as the commonest cancer among young women by the end of the year 1984. Thus any new treatment for the condition, whether it be merely palliative for the distressing symptoms, or more hopefully, curative, deserves careful assessment and consideration (Grant 1982), especially if that treatment is relatively innocuous to the patient. Such treatment has now come about in the form of photoradiation therapy.

Keywords

Bronchogenic Carcinoma Carbon Dioxide Laser Bronchial Carcinoma Haematoporphyrin Derivative Bronchial Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

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  • Philip Hugh-Jones

There are no affiliations available

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