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Experimental Bacteremic Vascular Graft Infection with Staphylococcus aureus. Comparative Colonization of Two Graft Materials and Prophylaxis of Late Infection

  • Catherine Leport
  • Olivier Goeau-Brissonniere
  • Claude Lebrault
  • Jean-Claude Péchere

Summary

In a dog model reproducing colonization of a vascular graft through an experimental bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Dacron grafts were more colonized than ePTFE grafts for durations of graft function of 2 hours up to 2 months, while at 6 months the inverse trend was observed, both material being still more susceptible than normal aortas. A single injection of ceftriaxone 90 minutes before the bacteremic challenge completely prevented late graft infection.

Keywords

Graft Function Graft Material Vascular Graft Graft Infection Dacron Graft 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Leport
  • Olivier Goeau-Brissonniere
  • Claude Lebrault
  • Jean-Claude Péchere

There are no affiliations available

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