Structural Organization of Specific Sensory and Motor Systems

  • A. G. Brown

Abstract

The neuronal subsystems concerned with sensory mechanisms (somaesthesia, vision, audition, balance, and olfaction and taste) and with motor mechanisms (posture and locomotion) have a number of features in common:
  1. 1.

    They are each organized with chains of neurons connected in an hierarchical (or serial) fashion, transmission between neurons taking place in the so-called relay nuclei.

     
  2. 2.

    Within each particular subsystem there is a series of distinct parallel pathways.

     
  3. 3.

    The organization within each subsystem is precise and is arranged in a topographical fashion, that is, within sensory systems the local relationships at the peripheral receptive surface are maintained in the receptive fields of neurons at each level of the system (sensory maps) and within the motor systems there are also motor maps.

     
  4. 4.

    In bilaterally symmetrical animals most of the specific sensory and motor systems cross the midline, in whole or in part.

     

Keywords

Dementia Retina Acetylcholine Corti Brodal 

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Further Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. G. Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.University of EdinburghSummerhall, EdinburghUK

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