Advertisement

Abstract

A large number of infectious agents have been identified in the nose, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa. The relationship of the infecting agents to pathological changes may be summarized under three headings:
  1. a)

    Colonization

     
  2. b)

    Transmission

     
  3. c)

    Association with local inflammatory change

     

Keywords

Paranasal Sinus Nasal Mucosa Inferior Turbinate Middle Turbinate Maxillary Antrum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alfaro DA, Michaels L (1980) The pathology of human and experimental scleroma (rhinoscleroma). Rev Inst Invest Med 9: 125–140Google Scholar
  2. Attia OM (1958) Rhinoscleroma and malignancy: two cases of rhinoscleroma associated with carcinoma. J Laryngol Otol 72: 412–415PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Black JIM (1966) Sarcoidosis of the nose. J Laryngol Otol 80: 1065–1068PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Boxall JD, Michaels L, Newton A, Alfaro DA (1980) The immunopathology of scleroma (rhinoscleroma). Rev Inst invest Med 9: 145–153Google Scholar
  5. Chandler FW, Kaplan W, Ajello L (1980) A colour atlas and textbook of the histopathology of mycotic diseases. Wolfe Medical, LondonGoogle Scholar
  6. Dixon FW, Hoerr NL, McCall JW (1949) Nasal mucosa in laryngectomized patients. Ann Otol Rhin Laryngol 58: 535–547Google Scholar
  7. Dworzack DL, Pollock AS, Hodges GR, Barnes WG, Ajallo L, Padhye A (1978) Zygomycosis of the maxillary sinus and palate caused by Basidiobolus haptosporus. Arch Int Med 138: 1274–1276CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Frederick J, Braude AI (1974) Anerobic infection of the paranasal sinuses. N Engl J Med 290: 135–137PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Fu YS, Perzin KH (1983) The nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses and nasopharynx. In: Silverberg (ed) Principles and practice of surgical pathology. vol 1. Wiley Medical, New York, pp 477–501Google Scholar
  10. Gwaltney JM, Hayden FG (1982) The nose and infection. In: Proctor DF, Anderson IB (eds) The nose: upper airway physiology and the atmospheric environment. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp 399–422Google Scholar
  11. Hora JF (1965) Primary aspergillosis of the paranasal sinus and associated areas. Laryngoscope 75: 768–773PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Khaleque KA (1963) Interesting findings in rhinosporidiosis. Am J Med 35: 566–568PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Kyriakos M (1977) Myospherulosis of the paranasal sinuses, nose and middle ear. A possible iatrogenic disease. Am J Clin Pathol 67: 118–130PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Lindsay JR, Perlman HB (1951) Sarcoidosis of upper respiratory tract. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 60: 549–566PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Lucas HA (1952) The histo-pathology of sinusitis. J Laryngol Otol 66: 480–489PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. McClatchie S, Warambo MW, Bremner AD (1969) Myospherulosis. A previously unreported disease? Am J Clin Pathol 51: 699–704PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. McGill TJ, Simpson G, Healy GB (1980) Fulminant aspergillosis of the nose and paranasal sinuses: a new clinical entity. Laryngoscope 90: 748–754PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. McKelvie P, Gresson C, Pokhrel RP, Jackson P (1968) Sarcoidosis of the upper air passages. Br J Dis Chest 62: 200–206PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Messerklinger K (1978) Endoscopy of the nose. Urban and Schwarzenberg, BaltimoreGoogle Scholar
  20. Reyes E (1946) Rhinoscleroma; observations based on study of 200 cases. Arch Dermatol 54: 531–537CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Ridley DS, Wise M (1965) Unusual disseminated infection with a phycomycete. J Pathol Bact 90: 675–679CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Rosai J (1978) The nature of myospherulosis of the upper respiratory tract. Am J Clin Pathol 69: 475–481PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Yassin A, El Shennawy M, El Enany G, Wassef NF, Shoeb S (1975) Leprosy of the upper respiratory tract. A clinical bacteriological, histopathological and histochemical study of twenty cases. J Laryngol Otol 89: 505–511PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Michaels
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pathology and BacteriologyInstitute of Laryngology and Otology (University of London)LondonEngland
  2. 2.Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear HospitalLondonEngland

Personalised recommendations