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Artificial Sphincter

  • William L. Furlow

Abstract

The development of a totally implantable, externally controllable artificial urinary sphincter by Scott et al. (19 73) has had a profound effect on men, women and children with urinary incontinence. From its inception, the bold concept of re-establishing volitional control of micturition through the use of an implantable device has stimulated the imagination of those of us who, over the years, have continued to search for new and improved methods whereby our patients can regain continence.

Keywords

Urinary Incontinence Bladder Neck Stress Incontinence Inflatable Cuff Artificial Urinary Sphincter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • William L. Furlow

There are no affiliations available

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