Treatment of Disorders Involving the Autonomic Nervous System

  • J. D. Parkes
  • P. Jenner
  • D. N. Rushton
  • C. D. Marsden
Part of the Treatment in Clinical Medicine book series (TC MEDICINE)

Abstract

Autonomic failure occurs as a result of preganglionic or postganglionic autonomic neuropathy, or where there is an extensive defect in the central segment of autonomic reflexes, as in tetraplegia, or (rarely) in failure of the sensory limb of the buffer reflexes. Different diseases affect different parts of the autonomic system, resulting in different patterns of autonomic failure. Autonomic defects that are asymptomatic and detectable only by tests are not usually worth treating.

Keywords

Indomethacin Imipramine Amitriptyline Metoclopramide Prazosin 

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Further Reading

  1. Bannister RW (ed) (1983) Autonomic failure: a textbook of clinical disorders of the autonomic nervous system. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  2. Brindley GS, Polkey CE, Rushton DN, Cardozo L (1986) Sacral anterior root stimulators: report of the first 50 cases. J Neurol Neurosurg PsychiatryGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. D. Parkes
    • 1
  • P. Jenner
    • 2
  • D. N. Rushton
    • 1
  • C. D. Marsden
    • 1
  1. 1.University Department of NeurologyKing’s College School of Medicine and Dentistry, and Institute of PsychiatryLondonUK
  2. 2.University Department of NeurologyInstitute of PsychiatryLondonUK

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