Pneumothorax and Pleural Effusions

  • Anne E. Tattersfield
  • Martin W. McNicol
Part of the Treatment in Clinical Medicine book series (TC MEDICINE)

Abstract

Spontaneous pneumothorax occurs most often in fit young patients, characteristically tall, thin and male, where it is usually due to rupture of a small subpleural bleb at the apex of the lung. Pneumothorax can also occur as a result of trauma, investigative procedures or underlying disease — staphylococcal pneumonia, asthma, emphysema, tuberculosis and carcinoma or, rarely, in patients with Marfan’s syndrome or in association with menstruation (catamenial pneumothorax). Management is usually straightforward in the young and fit but it can be very difficult in those with other chest problems. A pneumothorax is described as open or closed depending on whether the leak is sealed or not.

Keywords

Catheter Arthritis Pneumonia Tuberculosis Syringe 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Useful References

  1. Archer GJ, Hamilton AAD, Upadhyay R, Finlay M, Grace PM (1985) Results of simple aspiration of pneumothoraces. Br J Dis Chest 79: 177–182PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Hirsch A, Ruffle P, Nebut M, Bignon J, Chretien J (1979) Pleural effusion: laboratory tests in 300 cases. Thorax 34: 106–112PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Riordan JF (1984) Management of spontaneous pneumothorax. Br Med J 289: 71CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Spencer Jones J (1985) A place for aspiration in the treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax. Thorax 40: 66–67CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne E. Tattersfield
    • 1
  • Martin W. McNicol
    • 2
  1. 1.Respiratory Medicine UnitCity HospitalNottinghamEngland
  2. 2.Cardiothoracic DepartmentCentral Middlesex HospitalLondonEngland

Personalised recommendations