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Independent Living Applications

Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

Countries globally have been experiencing an unprecedented increase in the number of older adults. As a result there has been an elevated interest in understanding the factors that may support the maintenance of independent living and quality of life of older adults. There is a large role for innovative technology to support monitoring, early detection and management of health and wellbeing in the home. Most diagnostic and treatment approaches to health are centered in clinical settings, and very few have focused on improving the self-management of wellbeing using novel in-home, ICT (information communication technology) based intervention systems. Utilizing combinations of ambient sensor data acquisition, telehealth and ICT it is possible to predict changes in wellbeing, and to deliver feedback and interventions to support personal wellness management.

Keywords

  • User needs
  • Self-management of health and well-being
  • Reactive to proactive method of healthcare
  • ICT services
  • Telehealth
  • Smart homes
  • Independent living

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The dependency ratio is an age population ratio of those typically not in the labor force (the dependent part) and those typically in the labor force. It is calculated as (number of people aged 65 and over/number of people aged 15–64) × 100.

  2. 2.

    http://wid.wisc.edu/research/lel/

  3. 3.

    https://www.mindbloom.com/

  4. 4.

    http://moodjam.com/

  5. 5.

    http://moodpanda.com/

  6. 6.

    Centers for Disease Control: Chronic Disease at a Glance 2009. See:

    http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/publications/AAG/chronic.htm

  7. 7.

    Gerard Anderson, “Chronic Conditions: Making the Case for Ongoing Care” (Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease: November 2007). See: http://www.fightchronicdisease.com/news/pfcd/pr12102007.cfm

  8. 8.

    http://3millionlives.co.uk/

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Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge the team at CASALA and Netwell, all of whom have contributed to ongoing research there, including Rodd Bond, Andrew MacFarlane, Benjamin Knapp, Brian O’Mullane, Carl Flynn, John Loane and Andrea Kealy. CASALA is funded under Enterprise Ireland’s Applied Research Enhancement Program with support from EU structural funds. Research at the Netwell Centre is supported by Atlantic Philanthropies.

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Doyle, J., Walsh, L. (2015). Independent Living Applications. In: Hannah, K., Hussey, P., Kennedy, M., Ball, M. (eds) Introduction to Nursing Informatics. Health Informatics. Springer, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-2999-8_9

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