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Research Applications

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Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

Nursing research is a vital part of nursing professional practice, whether the activity is reading and critiquing research in order to use evidence in nursing practice, participate in research, or lead research. This chapter reviews the nursing research process and describes the types of technology available to conduct research with examples of recent research using the technology. Areas covered include idea generation, literature search and review, data collection and analysis tools for quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research, data and visualization tools. The ethical implications of using new technology for nursing research are briefly discussed and an example area of nursing informatics research is provided.

Keywords

  • Nursing research
  • Qualitative research
  • Quantitative research
  • Mixed methods research
  • Data collection
  • Data analysis
  • Knowledge translation
  • Time-motion studies
  • Informatics

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4471-2999-8_13
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Acknowledgements

The author wishes to thank the Library Services staff at The Ottawa Hospital for their help in reviewing the literature search section, supplying the list of common databases, the steps in developing a search strategy, and the description of MeSH terms.

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Correspondence to Kathryn Momtahan RN, PhD .

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Momtahan, K. (2015). Research Applications. In: Hannah, K., Hussey, P., Kennedy, M., Ball, M. (eds) Introduction to Nursing Informatics. Health Informatics. Springer, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-2999-8_13

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-2999-8_13

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