Hereditary Lesions

Chapter

Abstract

The malformative, inflammatory, or proliferative nature of cutaneous lesions may be confidently ascertained by their histopathologic picture. However, in the case of hereditary lesions, external examination is far more valuable. The external examination enables the practitioner to recognize at a glance, without recurring to ancillary studies, the probable hereditary nature of the disorder and hence the genetic background of the patient’s cutaneous lesions. Valuable clues for this purpose are the multiplicity of the lesions, their disseminated and variegated character, and their frequent association to metabolic problems and often to mental deficiency. The clinical impression is confirmed if the malady happens to run in the patient’s family and is transmitted according to Mendelian patterns of inheritance.

Keywords

Adenoma Fibril Hypothyroidism Sarcoidosis Gout 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Zappi DermatopathologyNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.CaldwellUSA

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