Deciding What Transport is for: Connectivity and the Economy

Chapter

Abstract

The evaluation of transport projects rests on comparing the costs of investment with their benefits. How we describe these benefits therefore has a strong impact on whether investments are made. One approach is to use time savings, but this abstracts from trip generation and economic impacts, and leaves it hard to incorporate environmental constraints. This however is still a dominant methodology amongst transport analysts. This chapter will critically evaluate these methodologies and the impact they have had on the ability to consider transport projects, with particular reference to the UK.

Keywords

Europe Steam Transportation Income Hull 

References

  1. 1.
    Levinson M (2006) The box: how the shipping container made the world smaller and the world economy bigger. Princeton University Press, PrincetonGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    OECD (2006) Infrastructure needs to 2030, OECD futures projectGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Crafts N, Leunig T (2005) The historical significance of transport for economic growth and productivity. Background paper for the Eddington reportGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Metz D (2008) The myth of travel time savings. Transp Rev 28(30):321–336CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Boston Consulting Group (2010) The connected kingdom: how the internet is transforming the UK economy, GoogleGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Glaeser E (2011) The triumph of the cityGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Institute for Transport Studies (2003) Values of travel time saving in the UK, Leeds UniversityGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
  9. 9.
    Standing Advisory Committee on Trunk Road Assessment (1991) Final Report, Department for TransportGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Volterra Consulting and Greater London AuthorityLondonUK

Personalised recommendations