Advertisement

Smart Rotors

  • A. Dimarogonas
  • A. Kollias
Conference paper

Abstract

The phenomenon of electro-rheology relates to changes in rheology of certain dispersions upon application of electrical fields and appears as an increase to the resistance of flow, and in some cases conversion from a fluid to solid behavior, under an increasing electrical field. Most ER fluids consist of a dispersion of fine particles in a liquid medium with the addition of a surfactant agent, for example silica particles in transformer oil with water added as surfactant. The shear stress consists of the Newtonian resistance plus a constant shear which depends on the applied electric field.

Through the controlled bearing properties, active control of the rotor dynamic behavior can be achieved. Thus, for example, transition through the critical speed can be virtually eliminated through active control of the bearings.

Keywords

Shear Rate Critical Speed Journal Bearing Eccentricity Ratio Slider Bearing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Arguelles J, Martin HR, Pick R (1974). Rheological Model for Steady Electroviscous Flow between Parallel Plates. Jr. Mech. Eng. Sc. 16(4):232–239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bailey T, Hubbard JE (1985). Distributed Piezoelectric - Polymer Active Vibration Control of a Cantilever Beam. Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics 8(5):605–611.CrossRefMATHGoogle Scholar
  3. Block H, Kelly JP (1988). Electro-Rheology. Jr. of Physics, D21(12):1661–1667.Google Scholar
  4. Boehme G (1987) Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics. North Holland, Amsterdam.MATHGoogle Scholar
  5. Bonnecase RT, Brady JF(1989). Dynamic Simulation of a Suspension Forming an Electrorheological Fluid. 2nd Int. Conf. on Electrorheological Fluids, Raleigh, NC.Google Scholar
  6. Brooks DA (1982). Electrorheological Fluids. Chart. Mech. Eng., vol. 63.Google Scholar
  7. Brooks D et al (1986). Viscoelastic Studies on an Electrorheological Fluid. Colloids Surf 18:293–312.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Bullough WA (1988). Electrorheological Fluids. Engineering, Feb., Tech. File 163:i–iv.Google Scholar
  9. Bullough WA, Stringer J.D. (1973). The Utilisation of the Electroviscous Effect in a Fluid Bearing. 3rd Int. FI. Power Symp, paper F3, Turin, Italy.Google Scholar
  10. Bullough WA, Foxon MB (1978). A Proportionate Coulomb and Viscously Damped Isolation System. J. Sound & Vib. 56(1):35–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Carlson JD, Duclos TG (1989). ER Fluid Clutches and Brakes — Fluid Property and Mechanical Design Considerations. 2nd Int. Conf. on Electrorheological Fluids, Raleigh, NC.Google Scholar
  12. Claus RO, Jackson BS, May RG (1985). NDE of Composites by Optical Time -Domain Reflectometry in Embedded Optical Fibers. IEEE SOUTHEASTCOM 85 Proceedings (Raileigh, NC):241–245.Google Scholar
  13. Conrad H, Chen Y, Sprecher AF. (1989). Electrorheology of Suspensions of Zeolite Particles in Silicon Oil. 2nd Int. Conf. on Electrorheological Fluids, Raleigh, NC.Google Scholar
  14. Cooper S (1963). Preliminary Investigation of Oil Films for the Control of Vibration. IME Lubrication and Wear Convention, Proceedings:305–315.Google Scholar
  15. Dimarogonas AD, Kollias A, Electroreological Fluid Smart Journal Bearings, Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (to appear).Google Scholar
  16. Dimarogonas AD, Haddad SD (1992). Vibration for Engineers. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs.MATHGoogle Scholar
  17. Dimarogonas AD, Paipetis SA (1983). Analytical Methods in Rotor Dynamics. Elsevier-Applied Science Publishers, London.Google Scholar
  18. Duclos TG, Coulter JP, Miller, LR. (1988). Applications for Smart Materials in the Field of Vibration Control. Proceedings, ARO Smart Materials, Structures and Mathematical Issues Workshop, Blacksburg, Va.:132–146.Google Scholar
  19. Eige J, Peschon J (1960). Vibration-Shock System. Int. Report, Project 3120, Stanford Univ.Google Scholar
  20. Gast AP, Adriani PM (1989). Microstructural Models of Electrorheological Fluids. 2nd Int. Conf. on Electrorheological Fluids, Raleigh, NC.Google Scholar
  21. Ghandi MV, Thomson BS (1988). A New Generation of Ultra Advanced Intelligent Materials Featuring Electrorheological Fluids. Proceedings, ARO Smart Materials, Structures and Mathematical Issues Workshop, Blacksburg, Va.:63–68.Google Scholar
  22. Gorodkin RG, Korobko YV (1979). Fluid Mech.- Soviet Res. vol. 8, 48.Google Scholar
  23. Inoue A (1989). Study of a New Electrorheological Fluid. 2nd Int. Conf. on Electrorheological Fluids, Raleigh, NC.Google Scholar
  24. Kerr J (1981). A Solid Chance to Jam Liquid Flow Lines. The Engineer, July 23:63–64.Google Scholar
  25. Klass DL, Martinek TW (1967). Electroviscous Fluids. I. Rheological Properties. J. Appl. Phys, v. 38, n. 1:67–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Klass DL, Martinek TW (1967).Electroviscous Fluids. II. Electrical Properties. J. Appl. Phys, v. 38, n. 1:74–80.Google Scholar
  27. Klingenberg DJ, Zukoski CF (1989). Structure Formation in Electrorheological Fluids. 2nd Int. Conf. on Electrorheological Fluids, Raleigh, NC.Google Scholar
  28. Korobko EV, Sh’ulman ZP, (1989). The Mechanism of Visco-plastic Behavior of Electrorheological Suspensions. 2nd Int. Conf. on Electrorheological Fluids, Raleigh, NC.Google Scholar
  29. Najji B, Bou-Said B, Berthe D, (1989). New Formulation for Lubrication with Non-Newtonian Fluids. ASME Journal of Tribology, 111:29–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Opperman G et al, (1989). Applications of Electroviscous Fluids as Movement Sensor Control Devices in Active Vibration Dampers. 2nd Int. Conf. on Electrorheological Fluids, Raleigh, NC.Google Scholar
  31. Papanastasiou TC (1987). Flows of Materials with Yield. Journal of Rheology 31(5):385–404.CrossRefMATHGoogle Scholar
  32. Reddi MM, Trumpler PR (1962). Stability of High-Speed Journal Bearings under Steady Load. 1: The Incompressible Film. ASME Journal of Engineering for Industry, ser. B, 84:351–358.Google Scholar
  33. Rogers CA, Robertshaw HH. (1988). Development of a Novel Smart Material. ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Chicago, Ill.Google Scholar
  34. Rogers CA, Barker DK, Jaeger CA. (1988) Introduction to Smart Materials and Structures. Proceedings, ARO Smart Matrials, Structures and Mathematical Issues Workshop, Blacksburg, Va.:17–28.Google Scholar
  35. Stangroom JE (1989). The Bingham Plastic Model of ER Fluids and its Implications. 2nd Int. Conf. on Electrorheological Fluids, Raleigh, NC.Google Scholar
  36. Strandrud HT (1966). Electric-field valves inside cylinder control vibrator. Hydraulics & Pnewmatics, September: 139–143.Google Scholar
  37. Shul’man ZP, et al (1986). Structure, Physical Properties and Dynamics of Magnetorheological Suspensions. Int. J. of Multiphase Flow v. 12, n. 6:935–955.CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  38. Shul’man ZP, et al (1987). Characteristics of an Electrorheological Damper in a Vibration Insulator. Inz.-Fiz. Zhur, v. 52, n. 2:237–244.Google Scholar
  39. Sproston JL, Stevens NG, Page IM (1983). An Investigation of Torque Transmission using Electrically Stressed Dielectric Fluids. Inst. of Phys. Conf. Ser. (66) 53–58.Google Scholar
  40. Tayal SP, Sinhasan R, Singh D.V. (1982). Analysis of Hydrodynamic Journal Bearings Having Non-Newtonian Lubricants Using the Finite element Method. ASLE Transactions 25 (3) 410–416.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Winslow WM (1947). Methods and means of translating Electrical Impulses into Mechanical Force. US Patent 2,147,850.Google Scholar
  42. Winslow WM (1949). Induced filtration of suspensions.J. Appl. Phys, v. 20:1137–1140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Winslow WM (1953). Field controlled hydraulic devise. US Patent 2,661,596.Google Scholar
  44. Wong W, Shaw M, (1989). Investigations of the Role of Moisture in Electrorheological Fluids. 2nd Int. Conf. on Electrorheological Fluids, Raleigh, NC.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Dimarogonas
    • 1
  • A. Kollias
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Engineering and Applied ScienceWashington UniversitySt LouisUSA

Personalised recommendations