The Use of New Technologies in the Development of Social Citizenship and of the Welfare State

  • Achille Ardigò
Part of the Artificial Intelligence and Society book series (HCS)

Abstract

The Welfare State has to cope with the consequences of new technologies1. The term Welfare State refers to the allocation by the State of public funds and services in order to assure to every citizen as a political right and not as charity, a minimum standard of income, nutrition, health, housing and education.

Keywords

Migration Europe Income Assure 

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Reference

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Achille Ardigò

There are no affiliations available

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