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Maternal-Fetal Conflict: Pregnant Drug Addicts

  • Bonnie Steinbock

Abstract

Hardly a day goes by, it seems, in which one does not read an article about the impact of the crack epidemic on babies. Here is a description of the neonatal intensive care unit of Bronx-Lebanon hospital: “filled with baby misery: babies born months too soon; babies born weighing little more than a hardcover book; babies that look like wizened old men in the last stages of a terminal illness, wrinkled skin clinging to chicken bones; babies who do not cry because their mouths and noses are full of tubes”.1 According to one commentator, “If cocaine use during pregnancy were a disease, its impact on children would be considered a national health care crisis”.2

Keywords

Pregnant Woman Prenatal Care York Time Moral Obligation Fetal Alcohol Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Anna Quindlen, Hearing the cries of crack. The New York Times, 7 October 1990, E19.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    A. Revkin, Crack in the cradle. Discover, September 1989, pp 63–69.Google Scholar
  3. 4.
    Celia W. Dugger, Infant mortality in New York City declines for first time in 4 years. The New York Times, 20 April 1991, pGoogle Scholar
  4. 7.
    Jane E. Brody, Cocaine: litany of fetal risks grows. The New York Times, 6 September 1988, C8.Google Scholar
  5. 8.
    Doberczak TM, Shanzer S, Senie RT, Kandall SR, Neonatal neurologic and electroencephalographic effects of intrauterine cocaine exposure. J Pediatr 1988; 113: 354–358.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Kevin Sack, Unlikely union in Albany: feminists and liquor sellers. The New York Times, 5 April 1991, Bl.Google Scholar
  7. 14.
    This point is made in Murray TH (1987) Moral obligations to the not-yet born: the fetus as patient. Perinatol 14: 329–343.Google Scholar
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  9. 18.
    Chavkin W (1990) Drug addiction and pregnancy: policy crossroads. Am J Public Health 80: 485.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 19.
    Rorie Sherman, Keeping baby safe from Mom. National Law Review, 3 October 1988, p 25.Google Scholar
  11. 20.
    Isabel Wilkerson, Court backs woman in pregnancy drug case. The New York Times, 3 April 1991, A15.Google Scholar
  12. 21.
    Tamar Lewin, Drug use in pregnancy: new issue for the courts. The New York Times, 5 February 1990, A14.Google Scholar
  13. 23.
    Tamar Lewin, Appeals court in Florida backs guilt for drug delivery by umbilical cord. The New York Times, 20 April 1991.Google Scholar
  14. 24.
    Jan Hoffman, Pregnant, addicted - and guilty? The New York Times Magazine, 19 August 1990, p 53.Google Scholar
  15. 27.
    Women’s Rights Project, American Civil Liberties Union, Memorandum: Update of state legislation regarding drug use during pregnancy, 22 May 1990.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bonnie Steinbock

There are no affiliations available

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