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Art, Science and Engineering

  • David M. W. Powers
  • Christopher C. R. Turk

Abstract

Our subject is the acquisition of Natural Language (NL) by computers. NL is not, in our view, a surface expression, or epiphenomenon, of a deeper, underlying cognitive process in the human brain. It is rather fundamental to, and pervasive of, cognition itself. For this reason we think that language is not the sole preserve of linguists, but is pivotal in all our interactions with the world, in our science, and in our thought.

Keywords

Machine Learn Natural Language Machine Translation Language Acquisition Cognitive Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. W. Powers
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Christopher C. R. Turk
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.FB InformatikUniversity of KaiserslauternPetershamAustralia
  2. 2.Honorary Associate in Computing, MPCEMacquarie UniversityPetershamAustralia
  3. 3.IMPACT LtdPetershamAustralia
  4. 4.‘Bentwys’, Llanbair DiscoedChepstow, GwentUK
  5. 5.College of CardiffUniversity of WalesUK

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