Vitamin B6 Metabolism in Relation to Metabolic Hyperoxaluria

  • P. K. S. Liu
  • G. A. Rose
Part of the The Bloomsbury Series in Clinical Science book series (BLOOMSBURY)

Abstract

Vitamin B6 is the family name for a group of closely related compounds derived from 3-hydroxy-2-methyl pyridine and exhibiting the biological activity of pyridoxine. Shown in Fig. 11.1 are the members of this family which includes pyridoxine (PN), pyridoxal (PL), pyridoxamine (PM), their respective 5′-phosphate esters, and the dead-end metabolite, 4-pyridoxic acid (4-PA).

Keywords

Acetonitrile Pyruvate Tryptophan Oxalate NADH 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. K. S. Liu
  • G. A. Rose

There are no affiliations available

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