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Salvage Procedures

  • Charles V. Mann
  • Richard E. Glass

Abstract

Despite the many procedures available for treating patients with faecal incontinence, a few remain incurable. The main reasons that account for such cases are patients whose mental or physical state constitutes a contraindication to a definitive attempt at surgical cure or a small residue of cases in whom surgery has failed. Many such “incurable” cases are residents of long-stay facilities for the elderly, and these form a constant pool of incontinent patients for whom a satisfactory cure of their incontinence problem has not been devised. It has been estimated that 17% of nursing home residents suffer from a significant incontinence problem [12]. For such cases a salvage procedure is often the only practical solution, especially when there is a serious degree of incontinence in a patient whose life expectancy is measured in years rather than months.

Keywords

Faecal Incontinence Anal Canal Anal Incontinence Salvage Procedure Gracilis Muscle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles V. Mann
    • 1
    • 2
  • Richard E. Glass
    • 3
  1. 1.Northwick Park and St Marks Hospital TrustHarrowUK
  2. 2.The Royal London Hospital TrustLondonUK
  3. 3.Princess Margaret HospitalSwindonUK

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