Recovery and Day Surgery

  • Roger J. Eltringham
  • Michael Durkin
  • William F. Casey

Abstract

Almost 50% of all elective surgery in the UK is now performed on a day-stay basis, facilities ranging from free-standing, purpose-built premises to day wards within a hospital site using dedicated lists in the main theatre suite. It is an efficient way of utilising resources and patient satisfaction can be very high. Since much of the preparation and late recovery of the patient must take place outside the hospital, meticulous organisation is essential and the provision of detailed information for patient, carer and community-health workers is vital.

Keywords

Nursing Staff Laryngeal Mask Airway Motion Sickness Dental Extraction Oral Hypoglycaemic Drug 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References and Bibliography

  1. Royal College of Surgeons of England (1992). Guidelines for Day Case Surgery. London.Google Scholar
  2. Healy TEJ (Ed) (1990). Anaesthesia for Day Case Surgery. Baillière’s Clinical Anaesthesiology, 4(3). Baillière Tindall, London.Google Scholar
  3. Caring for Children in the Health Services (1991). Just for the Day. National Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital, London.Google Scholar
  4. Wilkinson DJ (1993). Modern Day Surgery in Anaesthesia Review 10 (Ed. Kaufman, L). Churchill Livingstone, London, pp. 163–182.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roger J. Eltringham
    • 1
  • Michael Durkin
    • 1
  • William F. Casey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnaesthesiaGloucestershire Royal HospitalGloucesterUK

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