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Recent Developments in Automated Visual Inspection of Wood Boards

  • D. T. Pham
  • R. J. Alcock
Conference paper
Part of the Advanced Manufacturing book series (ADVMANUF)

Abstract

Automated Visual Inspection (AVI) is gaining increased interest as a means for controlling the quality of products. AVI gives better accuracy and consistency compared to human inspectors. Applications of AVI systems can be found in various industries including those dealing with electronics, food, metal and textiles. AVI is currently being used in the wood industry, where wood boards are sorted into quality categories based on an assessment of their surface appearance [1]. However, this task has the difficulty that wood is a natural material and so every board is unique. Also, certain defects, such as sound knots, do not differ significantly in brightness from clear wood. Some success has been achieved in this area but much effort still needs to be made to improve the process.

Keywords

Artificial Intelligence Technique Adaptive Thresholding Clear Wood Control Chart Pattern Image Enhancement Technique 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. T. Pham
  • R. J. Alcock

There are no affiliations available

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