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Direct Methods for Rapid Tool Production

  • D. T. Pham
  • S. S. Dimov

Abstract

Indirect methods for tool production as described in the previous chapter necessitate a minimum of one intermediate replication process. This might result in a loss of accuracy and could increase the time for building the tool. To overcome some of the drawbacks of indirect methods, some RP apparatus manufacturers have proposed new rapid tooling methods that allow injection moulding and die-casting inserts to be built directly from 3D CAD models. This chapter describes direct RT solutions that are currently commercially available.

Keywords

Injection Moulding Tooling Insert Ceramic Mould Rapid Manufacture Acrylic Emulsion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. T. Pham
    • 1
  • S. S. Dimov
    • 1
  1. 1.Manufacturing Engineering Centre, School of EngingeeringCardiff UniversityCardiffUK

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