New Lasers, Emerging Technology, Experimental and Developing Applications

  • Sean W. Lanigan

Abstract

Diode lasers were originally introduced in the 1980s with power outputs of only 100 mW. They are semiconductor devices which generate light when an electric current is passed through the diode. This conversion from electric energy to light energy is very efficient. More than 50% of the electrical power is converted into light, which can be contrasted with an argon laser where less than 1% of the electrical power is converted into light. Minimal heat is generated, so diode lasers can be small, lightweight, portable and quiet. Multiple diode laser arrays have now been developed which can be coupled directly into fibre-optic delivery devices and outputs have increased to 60 W or more. Diode lasers can be used to pump solid-state lasers instead of flashlamps (Fig. 9.1) or for contact, non-contact and interstitial applications across a wide range of medical disciplines.

Keywords

Burning Dioxide Argon Fluoride Shrinkage 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sean W. Lanigan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of DermatologyPrincess of Wales HospitalBridgendUK

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