The Evolution of Computer Bugs: An Interdisciplinary Team Work

  • Ole Caprani
  • Jakob Fredslund
  • Jørgen Møller Ilsøe
  • Jens Jacobsen
  • Line Kramhøft
  • Rasmus B. Lunding
  • Mads Wahlberg

Abstract

An investigation of robots as a medium for artistic expression started in January 2000. As a result, insect-like LEGO robots, Bugs, have been created, that through movements and sounds, are able to express what to an observer seem like emotions, intentions and social behaviour.

Keywords

Rubber Coherence Eter Straw Hunt 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ole Caprani
  • Jakob Fredslund
  • Jørgen Møller Ilsøe
  • Jens Jacobsen
  • Line Kramhøft
  • Rasmus B. Lunding
  • Mads Wahlberg

There are no affiliations available

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