Advertisement

Self-Efficacy Measure for Sleep Apnea (SEMSA)

  • Azmeh Shahid
  • Kate Wilkinson
  • Shai Marcu
  • Colin M. Shapiro
Chapter

Abstract

The SEMSA was developed in response to research indicating that cognitive factors like self-efficacy can significantly predict compliance with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), even in the first week of treatment [1]. The scale consists of 26 items and evaluates three cognitive subscales: the perceived risk of obstructive sleep apnea, CPAP outcome expectations, and treatment self-efficacy. By examining these cognitive issues prior to treatment, clinicians can identify those patients with low levels of self-efficacy and initiate educational interventions to improve treatment outcomes.

References

  1. 1.
    Stepnowky, C. J., Marler, M. R., & Ancoli-Israel, S. (2002). Determinants of nasal CPAP compliance. Sleep Medicine, 3(3), 239–247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Weaver, T. E., Maislin, G., Dinges, D. F., Younger, J., Cantor, C., McCloskey, S., & Pack, A. I. (2003). Obstructive sleep apnea risk: instrument development and patient perceptions of obstructive sleep apnea risk, treatment benefit, and volition to use continuous positive airway pressure. Sleep, 26(6), 727–732.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Representative Studies Using Scale

  1. Olsen, S., Smith, S., Oei, T., & Douglas, J. (2008). Health belief models predicts adherence to CPAP before experience with CPAP. European Respiratory Journal, 32(3), 710–717.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Baron, K. G., Smith, T. W., Czajkowski, L. A., Gunn, H. E., & Joes, H. R. (2009). Relationship quality and CPAP adherence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Behavioral Sleep Medicine, 7(1), 22–36.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Azmeh Shahid
    • 1
  • Kate Wilkinson
    • 1
  • Shai Marcu
    • 2
  • Colin M. Shapiro
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Toronto The Youthdale Child and Adolescent Sleep CentreTorontoCanada
  2. 2.University of Toronto The Youthdale Child and Adolescent Sleep CentreTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Toronto The Youthdale Child and Adolescent Sleep CentreTorontoCanada

Personalised recommendations