Advertisement

Experimental Characterization and Modeling of Shape Memory Material for Downhole Completion Applications

  • Chuanyu Feng
  • Goang-Ding Shyu
  • Sean Gaudette
  • Michael Johnson
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

Shape memory materials have promising applications in the oil and gas industry. A series of downhole completion applications based on this technology are under investigation at the Baker Hughes Center for Technology Innovation (CTI). The characterization of the shape memory materials, especially the time-dependent aspects of the material behavior, is critical for optimized product design, manufacturing and intended long-term applications. During manufacturing stage, rate-dependent hyperelastic behavior may be characterized by a series of potential functions, and shape memory behavior may be modeled through thermal effects or thermoviscoelastic effects. Thus, rate-dependent characterization tests were performed to determine the constants in the potential functions. For temperature- and rate-dependent shape recovery and stress recovery, experimental tests are critical for developing material models. In this paper, a brief review of different potential functions and shape memory models are presented and corresponding characterization results are discussed to facilitate further material modeling. In one of our targeted downhole completion applications, such information may be used for optimized product design and downhole performance prediction.

Keywords

Shape memory material Downhole completion Potential function Material characterization Mechanical testing 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Reference

  1. 1.
    Qi, H. J., Dunn, M. L., Long, K., Castro, F., and Shandas, R. Thermomechanical Indentation of Shape Memory Polymers, Behavior and Mechanics of Multifunctional and Composite Materials 2007, Proc. Of SPIE, Vol. 6526, 652615 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Feng, C., Shyu, G.D., Gaudette, S., and Johnson, M. H. “Shape Memory Material Manufacturing Design Optimization and Stress Analysis”, 2010 SIMULIA Customer Conference, May 25–27, 2010.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Abaqus analysis user's manual, Version 6.8/6.9, chapter 19, Hyperelasticity.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Liu, Y., Gall, K., Dunn, M. L., Greenberg, A.R., and Diani, J. Thermomechanics of Shape Memory Polymers: Uniaxial Experiments and Constitutive Modeling, International Journal of Plasticity 22 (2006), 279–313.MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Yuan, Y., Goodson, J., HTHP In-situ Mechanical Test Rig and Test Method for High Temperature Polymers and Composites, SPE 113516, 2008 SPE Europec/EAGE Annual Conference and Exhibition, Rome, Italy, 9–12 June 2008.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chuanyu Feng
    • 1
  • Goang-Ding Shyu
    • 1
  • Sean Gaudette
    • 1
  • Michael Johnson
    • 1
  1. 1.Baker Hughes IncHoustonUSA

Personalised recommendations