Mechanical Interactions of Mouse Mammary Gland Cells with a Three-Dimensional Matrix Construct

  • M. d. C. Lopez-Garcia
  • D. J. Beebe
  • W. C. Crone
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

One risk factor associated with breast cancer is tissue or mammographic density which is directly correlated with the stiffness of the tissue. We undertook a study of mammary gland cells and their interactions with the extracellular matrix in a microfluidic platform. Mammary gland cells were seeded within collagen gels inside microchannels, using concentrations of 1.3, 2, and 3 mg/mL, along with fluorescent beads to track strains in the gel. The cells and beads were observed via four-dimensional imaging, tracking X, Y, Z positions over a three to four hour time frame. Three-dimensional elastic theory for an isotropic material was employed to calculate the stress. The technique presented adds to the field of measuring cell generated stresses by providing the capability of measuring 3D stresses locally around the single cell and using physiologically relevant materials properties for analysis.

Keywords

Carboxylate 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Cukierman, E., et al., Taking cell-matrix adhesions to the third dimension. Science, 2001. 294(5547): p. 1708–1712.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Friedl, P. and E.B. Brocker, The biology of cell locomotion within three-dimensional extracellular matrix. Cellular And Molecular Life Sciences, 2000. 57(1): p. 41–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Jo, B.H., et al., Three-dimensional micro-channel fabrication in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer. Journal Of Microelectromechanical Systems, 2000. 9(1): p. 76–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Lopez-Garcia, M.d.C., D.J. Beebe, and W.C. Crone, “Mechanical Interactions of Mouse Mammary Gland Cells with Collagen in a Three-Dimensional Construct,” accepted for publication in Annals of Biomedical Engineering, March 2010.Google Scholar
  5. McDonald, J.C. and G.M. Whitesides, Poly(dimethylsiloxane) as a material for fabricating microfluidic devices. Accounts Of Chemical Research, 2002. 35(7): p. 491–499.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. d. C. Lopez-Garcia
    • 1
  • D. J. Beebe
    • 2
  • W. C. Crone
    • 3
  1. 1.Material Science ProgramWisconsin Institutes for Medical ResearchMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical EngineeringWisconsin Institutes for Medical ResearchMadisonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Engineering PhysicsUniversity of Wisconsin – MadisonMadisonUSA

Personalised recommendations