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Blast Performance of Sandwich Composites with Functionally Graded Core

  • Nate Gardner
  • Arun Shukla
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

Sandwich structures have important applications in the naval and aerospace industry, especially when they are subjected to high-intensity impulse loadings such as air blasts. During this event, the core materials play a vital role in the dynamic behavior of the sandwich structure. Since the material properties of a functionally graded/layered core can be designed and controlled, they show great potential to be an effective core design for absorbing the blast energy and improving the overall blast response of the sandwich structure. In this paper, an experimental investigation focuses on the blast resistance of sandwich composites with a functionally graded foam core subjected to shock wave loading. Four types of sandwich composites with a foam core graded/layered based on monotonically increasing the core layer wave impedance, while varying the number of core layers, have been studied. The experimental results show that monotonically increasing the core layer wave impedance while increasing the number of core layers, greatly reduces the wave impedance mismatch between consecutive layers and improves the overall blast resistance of the structure.

Keywords

Digital Image Correlation Sandwich Structure Face Sheet Blast Resistance Core Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Wang, E., Gardner, N., and Shukla, A., 2009. The blast resistance of sandwich composites with stepwise graded core. International Journal of Solids and Structures 46 (18–19) 3492–3502.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nate Gardner
    • 1
  • Arun Shukla
    • 1
  1. 1.Dynamic Photomechanics Laboratory, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering & Applied MechanicsThe University of Rhode IslandKingstonUSA

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