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Structural Damage Identification in Wind Turbine Blades Using Piezoelectric Active Sensing

  • Abraham Light-Marquez
  • Alexandra Sobin
  • Gyuhae Park
  • Kevin Farinholt
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

This paper presents a variety of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques, based on the use of piezoelectric active-sensors, used to determine the structural integrity of wind turbine blades. Lamb wave propagation, frequency response functions, and a time series based method are utilized to analyze the wind turbine blade. For these experiments, a 1m section of a 9m CX100 blade is used. Different types of simulated damage are introduced into this structure and a performance matrix is created to compare the validity and functionality of each technique. Overall, these three methods yielded sufficient damage detection to warrant further investigation into field deployment. Time series analysis shows the most effective and reliable to detect damage while lamb wave testing could locate, as well as detect the onset of damage. This paper summarizes considerations needed to design such SHM systems, experimental procedures and results, and additional issues that can be used as guidelines for future investigations.

Keywords

Wind Turbine Damage Detection Frequency Response Function Structural Health Monitoring Lamb Wave 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abraham Light-Marquez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alexandra Sobin
    • 2
  • Gyuhae Park
    • 3
  • Kevin Farinholt
    • 3
  1. 1.Dept. of Mechanical EngineeringNew Mexico Institute of Mining and TechnologySocorroUSA
  2. 2.Dept. of Aeronautic EngineeringDaniel Webster CollegeNashuaUSA
  3. 3.Los Alamos National LaboratoryThe Engineering InstituteLos AlamosUSA

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