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Self-Help

  • Philip R. Magaletta
  • Carl Leukefeld
Chapter
Part of the Issues in Children's and Families' Lives book series (IICL, volume 11)

Abstract

Self help approaches to addressing the needs of substance abusing offenders involved in the criminal justice system are frequently offered and understudied. This chapter collects, in one place, available information on self help 12-step approaches to substance abusing offenders, reviews the existing research, and recommends several strategies that criminal justice systems might consider when addressing 12-step approaches within their systems.

Keywords

Forensic Corrections Self help 12-step Offenders Administrators 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Federal Bureau of Prisons, Psychology Services BranchWashingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Behavioral ScienceCenter on Drug and Alcohol Research, University of KentuckyLexingtonUSA

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