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Sugar, Syrups and Honey

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
  • Katherine MJ Swanson
Chapter

Abstract

Useful testing for the microbiological safety and quality of cane and beet sugar, syrups, and honey is discussed. Ingredient, in-process, environmental, shelf life and end product tests vary in relative importance for different product types. Specific recommendations are provided, where appropriate.

Keywords

Beet Sugar Honey Sample Cane Sugar Clostridium Botulinum Critical Ingredient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
    • 1
  • Katherine MJ Swanson
    • 2
  1. 1.North RydeAustralia
  2. 2.EaganUSA

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