Advertisement

Utility of Microbiological Testing for Safety and Quality

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
  • Katherine MJ Swanson
Chapter

Abstract

Microbiological testing is used in food safety and quality management for a number of reasons including development of process controls, monitoring and verification of process control, investigation of the causes of loss of control and, in some situations, to directly assess product quality and safety. In each case the testing is related to microbiological criteria that define the acceptability of the food or the processes used to produce it. This chapter provides a brief introduction to microbiological testing in the management of microbial food safety and quality, as well as providing an introduction to the overall book.

Keywords

Corrective Action Sampling Plan Microbiological Testing Good Agricultural Practice Critical Control Point 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) (2007) Molecular methods for bacterial strain typing: approved guideline. CLSI document MM11-A. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, WayneGoogle Scholar
  2. Codex Alimentarius (1997a) Principles for the establishment and application of microbiological criteria for foods (CAC/GL-21). Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Program, FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  3. Codex Alimentarius (1997b) Recommended international code of practice for the general principles of food hygiene (CAC/RCP 1-1969). Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Program, FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  4. Codex Alimentarius (2008a) Guidelines for the validation of food safety control measures (CAC/GL 69–2008). Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Program, FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  5. Codex Alimentarius (2008b) Principles and guidelines for the conduct of microbiological risk management (CAC/GL 63–2007). Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Program, FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  6. ICMSF (International Commission for Microbiological Specifications for Foods) (1974) Microorganisms in foods 2: sampling for microbiological analysis; principles and specific applications. University of Toronto Press, TorontoGoogle Scholar
  7. ICMSF (1986) Microorganisms in foods 2: sampling for microbiological analysis; principles and specific applications, 2nd edn. University of Toronto Press, TorontoGoogle Scholar
  8. ICMSF (1988) Microorganisms in foods 4: application of hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) system to ensure microbiological safety and quality. Oxford Blackwell Scientific Publications, LondonGoogle Scholar
  9. ICMSF (2002a) Microorganisms in foods 7: microbiological testing in food safety management. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  10. ICMSF (2002b) Sampling to assess control of the environment. In: ICMSF Microorganisms in Foods 7 microbiological testing in food safety management. Kluwer Academic/Plenum, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  11. ICMSF (2006) Use of epidemiologic data to measure the impact of food safety control programs. Food Control 17:825–837CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. WTO (World Trade Organization) (1994) Agreement on the application of sanitary and phytosanitary measures. http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/sps_e/spsagr_e.htm. Accessed 14 October 2010

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF)
    • 1
  • Katherine MJ Swanson
    • 2
  1. 1.North RydeAustralia
  2. 2.EaganUSA

Personalised recommendations