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Chemoreception pp 277-283 | Cite as

Cholinergic Actions on Carotid Chemosensory System

  • Patricio Zapata
  • Carolina Larraín
  • Ricardo Fernández
  • Edison-Pablo Reyes
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 536)

Abstract

In simultaneous communications to the 15th International Congress of Physiological Sciences (Leningrad, 1935), Anichkovet aland Heymanset al.reported that intracarotid injections of acetylcholine (ACh) provoke reflex hyperventilation in cats and dogs, respectively (see Zapata, 1997b). The first evidence that ACh increases the frequency of chemosensory discharge(f x )of the carotid (sinus) nerve was provided by von Euleret al(1941). The attention on ACh as a stimulant of the arterial chemoreceptors (carotid bodies (CBs) and aortic bodies) became greater when the glomus cells of the CB were shown to synthesize and store ACh, which was released in response to hypoxia or electrical stimulation (Eyzaguirre and Zapata, 1968b).

Keywords

Carotid Body Cholinergic Action Glomus Cell Polygraphic Recording Nicotine Injection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricio Zapata
    • 1
  • Carolina Larraín
    • 1
  • Ricardo Fernández
    • 1
  • Edison-Pablo Reyes
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of NeurobiologyCatholic University of ChileSantiago

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