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Chemoreception pp 269-275 | Cite as

Hypoxic Augmentation of Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Carotid Body Function

  • Machiko Shirahata
  • Tomoko Higashi
  • Jeffrey A. Mendoza
  • Serabi Hirasawa
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 536)

Abstract

It is generally accepted that neurotransmitters are involved in hypoxic chemotransmission of the carotid body. The release of neurotransmitters from the glomus cell, a putative chemoreceptor cell, appears to be triggered by an influx of calcium and subsequent increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). Several reports indicate that L-type and some other types of voltage-gated calcium channels are responsible for neurotranmitter release from glomus cells. Since these channels are activated by depolarization of the cell membrane, mechanisms of hypoxic depolarization of glomus cells has been a major focus of investigation (Shirahata and Sham, 1999).

Keywords

Carotid Body Glomus Cell Mild Hypoxia Carotid Sinus Nerve Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Machiko Shirahata
    • 1
  • Tomoko Higashi
    • 1
  • Jeffrey A. Mendoza
    • 1
  • Serabi Hirasawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Environmental Health SciencesJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA

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