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Chemoreception pp 163-169 | Cite as

Mitochondrial Complex II is Essential for Hypoxia-induced ROS Generation and Vasoconstriction in the Pulmonary Vasculature

  • Renate Paddenberg
  • Anna Goldenberg
  • Petra Faulhammer
  • Ruediger C Braun-Dullaeus
  • Wolfgang Kummer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 536)

Abstract

In the pulmonary vasculature hypoxia induces vasoconstriction and vascular remodelling. By directing the blood flow away from poorly ventilated regions of the lung perfusion is matched to ventilation. However, persistent activation of these mechanisms causes pulmonary hypertension. Up to now both the molecular structure of the oxygen sensor and the subsequent signalling cascade are still under debate. A role as early mediator of the hypoxic response is discussed for reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the data presented in the literature about the hypoxic regulation of ROS generation are controversial. The aim of our study was to investigate the production of ROS by cells of small intrapulmonary arteries under conditions of normoxia and hypoxia. The source of normoxic and hypoxic ROS generation was characterized by application of inhibitors of the individual complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Additionally, the requirement of functional mitochondrial complex II for hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction was determined by videomorphometric analysis of small intrapulmonary vessels in precision cut lung slices.

Keywords

Reactive Oxygen Species Reactive Oxygen Species Production Reactive Oxygen Species Generation Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renate Paddenberg
    • 1
  • Anna Goldenberg
    • 1
  • Petra Faulhammer
    • 1
  • Ruediger C Braun-Dullaeus
    • 2
  • Wolfgang Kummer
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Anatomy and Cell BiologyJustus-Liebig-UniversityGiessenGermany
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicineJustus-Liebig-UniversityGiessenGermany

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