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Chemoreception pp 129-134 | Cite as

Doxapram Stimulates Carotid Body with Different Mechanisms from Hypoxic Chemotransduction

  • Toru Takahashi
  • Shinobu Osanai
  • Hitoshi Nakano
  • Yoshinobu Ohsaki
  • Kenjiro Kikuchi
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 536)

Abstract

Although it has been known that doxapram has stimulus effect on the carotid body (Mitchell and Herbert, 1975; Nishino, 1982), the mechanism has not yet been explained at the cellular or receptor level. Peers and Wyatt described the electrophysiological effects of doxapram on K+ channels on glomus cells and doxapram can inhibit the K+ current of the glomus cells (Peers, 1991; Wyatt and Peers, 1994). They forwarded a hypothesis that doxapram modulates carotid body chemoreception via the same signaling pathway as “the membrane model of O2 sensing” (for review see López- Barneo, 1996).

Keywords

Carotid Body Free Solution BKca Channel Glomus Cell Hypoxic Ventilatory Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toru Takahashi
    • 1
  • Shinobu Osanai
    • 1
  • Hitoshi Nakano
    • 1
  • Yoshinobu Ohsaki
    • 1
  • Kenjiro Kikuchi
    • 1
  1. 1.First Department of MedicineAsahikawa Medical College 2-1-1-1 Midorigaoka HigashiAsahikawaJapan

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