Medicaid Managed Care for Children and Youth

Managing Costs or Managing Care?
  • Arleen A. Leibowitz
Part of the Issues in Children’s and Families’ Lives book series (IICL, volume 2)

Abstract

Since 1990, states have shifted their financing and delivery of Medicaid services away from traditional fee-for-service (FFS) models and toward capitated, organized health care. Following Congressionally mandated expansions of Medicaid eligibility to large numbers of children above the poverty line in the late 1980s, states faced skyrocketing Medicaid costs. The number of children enrolled in Medicaid who were not receiving welfare income support grew an average of 17.6% a year from 1990 to 1995 and Medicaid expenditures on children grew by 17.3% a year over the same period (Liska, 1997). By 1998, Medicaid served one in five children in the United States (HCFA, 2000).

Keywords

Insurance Coverage Transportation Income Explosive Assure 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arleen A. Leibowitz

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