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Lipoxins and Aspirin-Triggered Lipoxins in Airway Responses

  • Bruce D. Levy
  • George T. De Sanctis
  • Pallavi R. Devchand
  • Eugene Kim
  • Kate Ackerman
  • Birgitta Schmidt
  • Wojciech Szczeklik
  • Jeffrey M. Drazen
  • Charles N. Serhan
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 525)

Abstract

Leukotrienes (LT) and prostaglandins (PG) have been implicated as proinflammatory mediators in asthma [1], while lipoxins (LX) are a distinct class of eicosanoids that carry unique counter-regulatory actions [2]. Analyses of the time course of appearance of eicosanoids during acute inflammation has revealed the early coordinate appearance of LT and PG with leukocyte recruitment followed by LX during resolution [3]. LX’s are generated in human tissues, including airways [4], and can interact with at least two classes of receptors, CysLT1 and LXA4 receptors (designated ALX) [5]. LX’s, aspirin-triggered 15-epimer-LX’s and stable, longer-acting analogs of these compounds can promote resolution of cytokine-driven acute inflammation [5], inhibit LTC4-stimulated airway hyper-responsiveness in human asthmatics [6] and block LTD4-initiated constriction of airway smooth muscle in vitro [7]. of note, aspirin-tolerant asthmatic individuals have a decreased biosynthetic capacity for LX’s [8]. In view of these intriguing findings, we determined the impact of LX’s in an experimental murine model of asthma [9].

Keywords

Airway Smooth Muscle Lipid Mediator Human Asthmatic Aerosol Challenge Experimental Murine Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce D. Levy
    • 1
  • George T. De Sanctis
    • 1
  • Pallavi R. Devchand
    • 2
  • Eugene Kim
    • 2
  • Kate Ackerman
    • 1
  • Birgitta Schmidt
    • 2
  • Wojciech Szczeklik
    • 2
  • Jeffrey M. Drazen
    • 3
  • Charles N. Serhan
    • 2
  1. 1.Pulmonary and Critical Care MedicineBrigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Ctr. for Experimental Therapeutics and Reperfusion InjuryBrigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Department of MedicineHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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