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Renal Effects of Selective Cyclooxygenase Inhibition in Experimental Liver Disease

  • Marta López-Parra
  • Joan Clària
  • Anna Planagumà
  • Esther Titos
  • Jaime L. Masferrer
  • B. Mark Woerner
  • Alane T. Koki
  • Wladimiro Jiménez
  • Vicente Arroyo
  • Francisca Rivera
  • Joan Rodés
Chapter
  • 140 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 525)

Abstract

Renal synthesis of vasodilator prostaglandins (PGs) plays a key role in the maintenance of renal function in decompensated cirrhosis [1,2]. In fact, acute PG inhibition with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with cirrhosis and ascites is associated with a significant impairment in renal hemodynamics, sodium excretion, free water clearance and the renal response to furosemide and spironolactone [1-3]. Thus, in clinical practice, patients with decompensated cirrhosis cannot be treated with NSAIDs on a long-term basis because of the high risk of developing renal failure and refractory ascites.

Keywords

Urinary Sodium Excretion Decompensated Cirrhosis Refractory Ascites Free Water Clearance Conventional NSAID 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marta López-Parra
    • 1
  • Joan Clària
    • 1
  • Anna Planagumà
    • 1
  • Esther Titos
    • 1
  • Jaime L. Masferrer
    • 2
  • B. Mark Woerner
    • 2
  • Alane T. Koki
    • 2
  • Wladimiro Jiménez
    • 3
  • Vicente Arroyo
    • 4
  • Francisca Rivera
    • 4
  • Joan Rodés
    • 4
  1. 1.DNA Unit, Hospital Clinic, Institut d’Investigacions Biomédiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS)Universitat de BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  2. 2.Pharmacia Research and DevelopmentSt Louis, MissouriUSA
  3. 3.Hormonal Laboratory, Hospital Clinic, Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS)Universitat de BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  4. 4.Liver Unit, Hospital Clinic, Institut d’Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS)Universitat de BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain

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