Medicalization and Regulation of Deviant Religions

An Application of Conrad and Schneider’s Model
  • James T. Richardson
  • Mary White Stewart
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

Discussions over the past few decades of involvement in new religions or “cults” in medical and social scientific journals, courtroom trials, and media treatments reveal a volatile controversy about the meaning of membership in groups such as the Unification Church, the Hare Krishna, Scientology, The Family, and other relatively “high demand” religions.1 Such discussions have significant implications for regulating these controversial groups.

Keywords

Depression Europe Neral Azine Assure 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • James T. Richardson
  • Mary White Stewart

There are no affiliations available

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