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Linear Spatially Encoded Combinatorial Chemistry with Fourier Transform Library Analysis

  • Alan W. Schwabacher
  • Christopher W. Johnson
  • Peter Geissinger

Abstract

An effective combinatorial chemical technique must facilitate all aspects of the experiment, including synthesis, Assay, and association of structure with activity; it must also provide output data in a usable form. The combinatorial technique best applied to a given study depends on many factors, with the availability of a high-throughput assay critical to the choice of library size. It is also important to distinguish between library experiments where the target is a substance, And those where information is sought. A selection scheme with subsequent decoding of active compounds is appropriate when searching for a substance, while a spatially encoded procedure in which all library members are identified can potentially provide more information.

Keywords

Solid Support Fitness Profile Parallel Synthesis Cotton Thread Fluorenyl Methoxy Carbonyl 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan W. Schwabacher
    • 1
  • Christopher W. Johnson
    • 1
  • Peter Geissinger
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA

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