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Social Skills Instruction for Children with Asperger Syndrome

  • Brenda Smith Myles
Part of the Issues in Children’s and Families’ Lives book series (IICL, volume 3)

Abstract

Although relatively little research has been conducted on the nature of the social disability in Asperger Syndrome (AS) (Klin, Volkmar, & Sparrow, 2000; Myles & Simpson, 2002), researchers and practitioners generally agree that this area presents the greatest challenge throughout life (Barnhill, Hagiwara, Myles, Simpson, Brick, & Griswold, 2000; Church, Alisanski, & Amanullah, 2000; Myles & Adreon, 2001; Szatmari, 1991; Williams, 2001). The impact of social skills difficulties is pervasive across varying environments, even in structured settings designed to elicit prosocial behaviors. Social skills challenges range from not being able to develop and keep friendships to being ridiculed by peers to not being able to keep a job due to a lack of understanding of workplace culture and relationships among subordinates and supervisors (Baron-Cohen, O’Riordan, Stone, Jones, & Plaisted, 1999; MacLeod, 1999; Myles & Simpson, 2003).

Keywords

Social Skill Asperger Syndrome High Functioning Autism Social Story Future Horizon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

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  • Brenda Smith Myles

There are no affiliations available

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