Advertisement

Modelling Plume Rise and Dispersion of Power Plant Flue Gases Discharged Through Cooling Towers

  • Öznur Oğuz
  • Coşkun Yurteri
  • Gürdal Tuncel
Conference paper

Abstract

Conventionally, treated flue gases of fossil-fueled thermal power plants are discharged through specially designed stacks in order to increase atmospheric dispersion. One of the innovative technologies involves the discharge through cooling towers instead of conventional tall stacks. The so-called “cooling tower discharge” (CTD) technology has proven to provide better dispersion of the power plant plume in the atmosphere (Schatzmann et al., 1984; Glamse et al., 1989; Ernst et al., 1986). Owing to its natural buoyancy and large heat content, the cooling tower plume mixed with the treated flue gas reaches considerably greater heights in the atmosphere. The CTD plume can even penetrate through the inversion layers (Ernst et al., 1986). The CTD technology, therefore lead a considerable decrease in the GLC values of pollutants by providing a better dispersion in the atmosphere (Ernst et al., 1986; Schatzmann et al., 1987).

Keywords

Thermal Power Plant Cool Tower Atmospheric Dispersion Plume Rise Ground Level Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Glamser, J., Eikmeier, M., and Petzel, H.K., 1989, Advanced Concepts in FGD Technology: The Shu Process with Cooling Tower Discharge, JAPCA, 39(9), 1262–1267.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Ernst, G., Leidinger, B.J.G., Natusch, K., Petzel, K.H., and Scholl, G., 1986, Cooling Tower and flue Gas Desulfurization Plant of the Model Power Station Volklingen, Brennstoff Warme Kraft, 38(11), 510–511.Google Scholar
  3. Schatzmann, M., Lohmeyer A. and Ortner, G., 1987, Flue Gas Discharge from Cooling Towers: Wind Tunnel Investigation of Building Downwash Effect on Ground-Level Concentrations, Atmospheric Environment, 21(8), 1713–1724.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Schatzmann, M. and Policastro, A.J., 1984, An Advanced Integral Model for Cooling Tower Plume Dispersion, Atmospheric Environment, 18(4), 663–674.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. EPRI, 1997, Plume Rise and Downwash Modeling Project, Conducted by Electrical Power Research Institute.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Öznur Oğuz
    • 1
  • Coşkun Yurteri
    • 2
  • Gürdal Tuncel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental EngineeringMiddle East Technical UniversityAnkaraTürkiye
  2. 2.ENVY Energy and Environmental Investments Inc.AnkaraTürkiye

Personalised recommendations