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Superficial Tissue Microsonography

  • Andrzej Nowicki
  • Jerzy Litniewski
  • Jacek Liwski
  • Wojciech Secomski
  • Paweł Karłowicz
  • Marcin Lewandowski
Part of the Acoustical Imaging book series (ACIM, volume 22)

Abstract

A number of recent years have seen a growing interest among biologists and clinicians in surface tissue imaging and vessel wall examinations performed in the course of operations. Yano et al [1987] were among the first to describe a system permitting sector skin imaging using a 40 MHz lithium niobate transducer. These authors achieved a beam width (-6dB) in the focus zone equal to about 0.1 mm. The transverse resolution as determined from measurements of the length of a pulse reflected from an ideal reflector was equal to 0.1 mm. Hoss, Emert et al. [1992] developed a system with a 40 MHz centre frequency with a very wide band [- 6 dB], close to 50 MHz. Such a wide band made it possible to use on the transmission side chirp modulation pulses and analog signal compression of a signal received using all-pass filters. Berson et al. [1992] described a scanner for skin imaging, working at 17 MHz, with 0.1 mm longitudinal resolution and 0.3 mm transverse resolution. Feuillard et al. [1994] improved the Berson system, replacing a ceramic PZT transducer by a 45 MHz wideband transducer of P(VDF-TrFe). The development of high-frequency ultrasound diagnosis turns to completely new areas of application in dermatology and diagnosis of skin diseases, with consideration given to neoplastic lesions and watching progress in the treatment of them. Ophthalmologic applications seem to be very essential in terms of imaging cornea, sciera, iris and ciliary body. The purpose of our study was to develop a real time device for skin and eye imaging in 2D mode and image reconstruction in C mode with lateral and axial resolution better than 0.1 mm. The high resolution scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) for tissue structure study was also developed.

Keywords

Lithium Niobate Ciliary Body Focus Zone Neoplastic Change Scanning Acoustic Microscope 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Berson M., Vaillant L., Patat F., Pourcelot L., 1992, High resolution real time ultrasonic scanner, Ultrasound Med.and Biol., 18, 5, 471–478.Google Scholar
  2. Feuillard G., Lethiecq M., Tessier L., Patat F., Berson M., 1994, High resolution B scan imaging of the skin using a 50 MHz P(VDF-TrFe)-based ultrasonic transducer, European J.Ultrasound, 1,2, 183–189.Google Scholar
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  5. Yano T., Fukuita H., Ueno S., Fukumoto A., 40 MHz ultrasound diagnostic system for dermatologie examination. IEEE 1987 Ultrasonic Symposium Proceeding, 1987; 857–878.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrzej Nowicki
    • 1
  • Jerzy Litniewski
    • 1
  • Jacek Liwski
    • 1
  • Wojciech Secomski
    • 1
  • Paweł Karłowicz
    • 1
  • Marcin Lewandowski
    • 1
  1. 1.Ultrasound Department, Institute of Fundamental Technological ResearchPolish Academy of SciencesWarsawPoland

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