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High Frequency Integrated Ultrasound Arrays

  • A. D. Armitage
  • Q. X. Chen
  • J. V. Hatfield
  • P. J. Hicks
  • P. A. Payne
Part of the Acoustical Imaging book series (ACIM, volume 22)

Abstract

There is increasing interest in the use of ultrasound imaging techniques at frequencies in excess of 20 MHz. Examples may be found in both medicine and industry. This places a great demand on the imaging systems employed, particularly if the aim is to produce real time images using multi-element arrays. The Ultrasound Research Group at UMIST have been working along these lines for a number of years and this paper represents a report on work in progress covering beam plotting experiments to investigate the characteristics of the transmitted ultrasound field. We also report on preliminary results from the receive system which is based on phased array techniques.

Keywords

Ultrasound Imaging Acoustical Image Porcine Skin Application Specific Integrate Circuit CMOS Chip 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. D. Armitage
    • 1
  • Q. X. Chen
    • 2
  • J. V. Hatfield
    • 1
  • P. J. Hicks
    • 1
  • P. A. Payne
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Electrical Engineering and ElectronicsUniversity of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST)ManchesterUK
  2. 2.Instrumentation and Analytical ScienceUniversity of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST)ManchesterUK

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